Tag Archives: Changing Jobs

Personal Update Q1 2014

It’s been over a month since I posted about how to balance my life, and posted at all. I did set some goals. I even met with several mentors to try to pave a career vision, mission and goals. I also hoped to find some aspect of my extracurricular career I could cut out. I am still searching for that piece(s). In fact, I tried to de-volunteer myself from a committee and was told I was needed and they would work around my schedule. Yikes! Continue reading Personal Update Q1 2014

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Trying to exit honorably

In a prior blog post, I mentioned pursuing a new job opportunity, with more of a management role along with continuing my small animal ER clinical duties. Last week, I gave my notice to my employer, who shall remain nameless. After advice from many friends and professionals, I decided to focus on pursuing the management opportunity as my reason for leaving, and not mention the other issues I was having with the company. Be diplomatic, and don’t burn my bridge.

I nervously but confidently, walked in and when asked when I would leave I replied that I would honor my 45 days notice stipulated in my contract. He asked if I could stay on an extra 10 days, since covering shifts can be difficult, and I happily agreed and my new employer was flexible. The next day a company email went out (which I was conveniently left off of) asking to cover my shifts effective immediately and to not let me know.  It even stated that this was because I was going to a competing clinic. I have no proprietary information, and I would have been flexible if he had told me that when we met. He still has not told me of his plan, and feel this behavior was unprofessional and underhanded.

I am sharing this knowledge because sometimes you can do the right thing and it does not matter. My bridge is burned, an ego is bruised, but in the end I am all the better for it.  As for my reaction, I have reneged on my agreement to stay the extra 10 days, but have requested in email for confirmation of my last day as my 45th day since giving notice. Again, the honorable and professional way. No underhanded emails or scare tactics. If I am asked to leave early, well, so be it.

When in doubt, be professional and do the right thing. This profession is small and I am confident that people are taking notice of the right and wrong way to exit honorably.

Time to Turn Another Corner

As you become older, you realize life is all about decisions- both big and small. This is probably why many children want to be older; they want to make their own decisions.  Then you grow up and wish someone could tell you what to do. Oh the irony of life.

I am Type A, as many of you are too if you are engaged in veterinary medicine. I like the timeline of life to be neat and tidy and make sense. Through the last 2 months I have realized that life does not always want to be neat and tidy and you have to throw that desire out the window and become comfortable with change.

I have recently decided to switch employers for a career opportunity to become a clinic manager in addition to the duties of an associate veterinarian. I struggled with my strong pull toward loyalty to my employer and my fear of becoming complacent in my career. In the end, I chose to further my career. The decision seems straight forward now, but at the time I was trying to make the decision based on what if scenarios. What if I start a family in the next year? What if Matt finds a job in another location? Should I switch jobs after only 1 year, will I look like a job hopper?

With some help from my friends for some perspective, I took a risk. While I have not started the new position yet, it just feels right. Since I am Type A, it’s funny how I have made some of biggest decisions on “it just feels right”- my marriage, my first dog adoption (unplanned), even my decision to leave my career in finance and go to vet school (this was not always the case if you read my previous blog).

When it became time to write out the pros and cons of moving on, the decision was clear. Luckily, I had the support to move forward. I spent time at the other clinic to try to ensure it was the right fit, and I tried to negotiate the areas of my current job I was unsatisfied with. The right decision presented itself clearly after a week of deliberation.

In summary, it is important to take risks and continue moving forward with life.  Unfortunately, we all have to make decisions. Some will be wrong, even if they feel right. The best thing is to take your time, keep a level head, and make a list- the right choice will pop out at you.